MIRÓ AND THE PERSONNAGES
What I call femme is not a feminine creature, it is a universe
-Joan Miró-
The human figure is represented by signs that refer to universal concepts. The woman and the man are often reduced to one single part of their anatomy: big heads and enormous feet and legs in contact with the earth; eyes, isolated and inquisitive, or the feminine breasts, representing maternity.
Miro_La pedra filosofalPICASSO AND MIRÓ
Picasso always obeyed his temperament, his most spontaneous and natural whimsical outbursts, passionately and without a second thought. In the same way, Miró expressed himself with a vital trait, a gesture born from the feelings. Essentially, with the use of the colour black, Miró’s line is executed with the minimum number of elements, but with the highest intensity: a simplification of colours and shapes in order to recover the elemental purity.
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Miro_EustachePLENSA AND MIRÓ
Plensa conceives his works considering man as the epicentre in the classical mind-body dualism. The body is always implicit in his work and becomes his universe. The concept of the body, understood as a space of coexistence of the telluric and the organic, is shared by Miró.
MIRÓ IS MOVEMENT AND COLOUR
I work a lot with my fingers: I have a need to participate in the physical reality of the ink, the colour; I need to get dirty from head to toe.
-Joan Miró
The intense colour palette used by Miró centres on the red and the blue in contrast to black, white and grey, which serve as elements that structure the space. The red is energy and heat: the sun, the sexual organs and the earth. The yellow represents brightness. The blue speaks to us about balance and placidity. The green and the orange often go hand in hand. The purples and granates are linked to spots, splashes and trickles of paint.
CALDER AND MIRÓ
Calder decided to create abstract works that contained movement; that reflected, thanks to their dynamism, the changing effects of light. His works are organic form structures, hanging in the air, which have a certain affinity with the art works of his friend Miró. As well as Miró, Calder uses elemental colours and simple lines that outline the shapes in black, and transmit a feeling of weightlessness and movement.